Rabu, 31 Maret 2010

FEMA EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT HIGHER EDUCATION PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

July 10, 2008 Update

Background, Mission, Current Status, and Future Planning

B. Wayne Blanchard, Ph.D., CEM
Higher Education Program Manager
Emergency Management Institute
National Preparedness Directorate
Federal Emergency Management Agency
Department of Homeland Security
16825 S. Seton, K-011
Emmitsburg, MD 21727
wayne.blanchard@dhs.gov
http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu


Contents



Definition

Program History Synopsis:

Background Context in 1994 and Today

Mission

Customers

Vision

Values

Principles

Goals

Objectives

Tasks

Fiscal Year 2008

Fiscal Years 2009-2013 Plan

Fiscal Years 2009 – 2013 Budget Requirements

Obstacles to EM Hi-Ed Program Development:














FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education (EM Hi-Ed) Program

Definition:

A program created in 1994 at FEMA’s Emergency Management Institute (EMI) in Emmitsburg, MD to encourage and support the dissemination of hazard, disaster, and emergency management-related information in colleges and universities across the United States.

Program History Synopsis:

In late 1993 a new Superintendent was posted to EMI. Hurricane Andrew had occurred the year before and there were training implications from the “lessons observed” in the failure of all levels of government to adequately respond to this hurricane. One of the first decisions the new Superintendent made was to focus scarce resources much more concretely on operational level and capability building training. He also accurately foresaw that within an agency now focused on large-scale disaster preparedness and response operations, on “no more Andrew’s,” additional budgetary and human resources were unlikely to be provided to the training and education mission. He thus concluded that with austere budgetary and human resources EMI could no longer seek to be both an educational and training institution, and decided to “hand-off” EMI’s educational mission to institutions of higher education.

In early 1994 the Superintendent recruited a program manager who had worked for him in his previous executive-level position at FEMA Headquarters, to transition EMI’s educational mission to colleges and universities and to work with them to foster a higher level of commitment hazards, disasters, and what to do about them (emergency management). Thus was created the FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Program. At the time there was one Bachelor’s program in emergency management in the U.S., and three collegiate certificate programs – two for non-academic credit – essentially contract training programs managed from a base on a college campus.

In the fourteen years since 1994 the EM Hi-Ed Program has helped foster growth in the higher education community to include more than 150 emergency management programs and expanded the reach of emergency management higher education into the practitioner community. Approximately 10,000 students are enrolled in these programs and another 20,000 annually take courses within these programs. Our experience with Emergency Management Higher Education over the past decade leads to the following three general observations:

• Programs have and continue to explode in number – roughly dozen per year, ~150 now.
• Once programs are in-place the rule is that they grow and become successful.
• Traditional college students get relevant jobs.

Today, interest in the program is such that more than 8000 customers and stakeholders are self-subscribed through a list serve for the almost daily distribution of the FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Report, a communication tool which seeks to service the EM Hi-Ed Community, and other interested parties, with information on reports, studies, and other news and developments of the day related to EM Hi-Ed.
Background Context of Emergency Management Higher Education in the U.S.:

Problems faced today much more complex and different from those faced even a generation ago:

• Growth and changes in this country and in the international political environment have created new threats and challenges for our society.

• Life is getting more complicated, with new technologies and the unfamiliar vulnerabilities and threats they bring, and aging infrastructure.

• Population growth and development has placed more people in harms way.

• The movement of people into the Sunshine States place them at greater risk to such hazards as earthquakes, hurricanes, wildfires, and tornadoes.

• With the planet becoming “flatter” and more populated, threats of communicable disease spread, including pandemics become more probable and conceivably more dangerous.

• The most recent rise in international terrorism makes life more dangerous.

Underlying Problems in 1994 and today:

• We build in floodplains.
• We destroy wetlands
• We build along earthquake faults
• We build on the coast
• We build on the alluvial fans from mountains
• We build in and near forests susceptible to wildfire
• We don’t zone, code, build, inspect and maintain as appropriately as is feasible

Professionalism within the National Emergency Management System Needs Enhancement.
• In the past a sizeable proportion of the EM community was not college educated
• Knowledge Base – experiential and learn-on-the-job
• Positions too frequently obtained other than with EM competencies & fundamentals
• Emergency management a second or third career
• Emergency managers too frequently not full-time professionals nor valued as such
• Baby Boomer Emergency Management Community Retirement Aged

Disaster losses are increasing in the U.S. – doubling to tripling per decade, controlled for inflation. Disasters are and will be a growth business.

The surrounding social, economic, political and bureaucratic contexts within which EM operates has also become more complicated – requiring more sophisticated engagement.


Mission:

Serve as the Nation’s leading focal-point for emergency management higher education, foster the professionalization of the field via educational efforts, and contribute to a more resilient nation by creating a cadre of professional emergency managers.

Customers:

Collegiate faculty, administrators, and students (traditional and practitioner)

Public and private sector “emergency management” & related practitioners

Stakeholders -- emergency management and related professional organizations.


Vision:

A future wherein more and more emergency managers in government and business come to the job with college education that includes a course of study in emergency management;

A future wherein more professionals in other fields become more “disaster sensitive” and aware of emergency management and the importance of the emergency management and homeland security missions;

A future wherein more emergency management practitioners incorporate the collegiate experience into their professional development, growth and constant improvement goals;

A future wherein the new academic discipline of emergency management spawns emergency management sub-disciplines;

A future wherein an emergency management educational experience and foundation will not only lead to a more highly educated emergency management cadre but a cadre which will operate from a knowledge, science, and theory-based framework and possess higher level business and management level skill sets (i.e., strategic-thinking, leadership and executive skills, customer service orientation, etc.); and,

A future wherein emergency management has undergone transformational professionalization through:

• Emergency Management Higher Education, including a focus on experiential learning, and incorporation of governmental material into the educational environment
• Training programs which have been enhanced through incorporation of academic educational material, and experiential learning…

To the point that EM is more regularly established as a career of 1st choice and emergency managers are better enabled to serve as catalysts for a safer America.
Values

In managing the FEMA/NPD/EMI Emergency Management Higher Education Program and dealing with our constituencies we adhere to the following values:

• Customer Service
• Open Communication
• Need-to-Share versus Need to Know
• Fairness
• Integrity
• Accountability
• Resourcefulness
• Equitable Partnership Building

Principles

We adhere to the following Principles of Emergency Management enunciated by the Emergency Management Roundtable of Stakeholders on September 11, 2007:

1. Comprehensive – emergency managers consider and take into account all hazards, all phases, all stakeholders and all impacts relevant to disasters.
2. Progressive – emergency managers anticipate future disasters and take preventive and prepara¬tory measures to build disaster-resistant and disaster-resilient communities.
3. Risk-driven – emergency managers use sound risk management principles (hazard identifica¬tion, risk analysis, and impact analysis) in assigning priorities and resources.
4. Integrated – emergency managers ensure unity of effort among all levels of government and all elements of a community.
5. Collaborative – emergency managers create and sustain broad and sincere relationships among individuals and organizations to encourage trust, advocate a team atmosphere, build consensus, and facilitate communication.
6. Coordinated – emergency managers synchronize the activities of all relevant stakeholders to achieve a common purpose.
7. Flexible – emergency managers use creative and innovative approaches in solving disaster challenges.
8. Professional – emergency managers value a science and knowledge-based approach based on education, training, experience, ethical practice, public stewardship and continuous improve¬ment. (Emergency Management Roundtable, Sep. 11, 2007, p. 4)









Goals of the FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Program

Provide federal-level leadership for progressive growth of the Emergency Management Higher Education community.

Contribute to growth/refinement of the academic discipline of emergency management.

Support FEMA Vision, Mission, New FEMA Transformation and Policy Goals.

Support FEMA National Preparedness Directorate mission of overseeing coordination and development of strategies necessary to prepare the Nation for all-hazards.

Establish/maintain partnerships with stakeholder organizations, e.g., IAEM.

Development of future cadre of emergency management and related professionals grounded in emergency management, social and natural science knowledge, administrative and managerial skills and technical and personal competencies.

Contribute to the professionalization of the emergency management community, as in the evolution of perceptions of emergency management from one of primarily ambulances at the bottom of the cliff to one which also builds fences at the top.

Knowledge Transfer:

• Advance the state of knowledge of hazards, disasters and emergency management;
• Support translation of governmental materials into educational materials;
• Support translation and use of emergency management academic educational material into emergency management training materials.

Generate new knowledge – through EM Hi-Ed Community research.

Contribute to the further legitimization of the emergency management profession through the establishment and growth of an academic Emergency Management Discipline.

Leverage growth of an academic emergency management educational community into advocacy of a national culture of disaster prevention and preparedness – vocal voices reaching audiences emergency management professionals have difficulty reaching.

Development of a Culture of Preparedness and Prevention wherein the emergency manager understands and accepts the importance of community capacity building; and wherein the emergency manager more actively brings people together from a variety of backgrounds and disciplines to refract problems through the prism of complementary minds allied in common purpose.

Support the development and refinement of a an academic Theory of Emergency Management to underpin a governmental Doctrine of Emergency Management.
Objectives of the FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Program

Encourage and support the increase in the number of EM collegiate programs in the US.

Support the continued growth of existing emergency management collegiate programs.

Nurture the sense of an Emergency Management Higher Education Community.

Define Core Curriculum at each academic level -- work with academic and practitioner communities to better define and build the curriculums at AD, BA/BS, MA, and PhD levels.

Provide a full-service emergency management higher education focal point for the wide range of collegiate emergency management higher education community
• Doctoral programs
• Masters programs
• Bachelors programs
• Associate programs (community, technical and junior colleges)

Within this range we particularly support programs which stress
• Development of executive-level leadership and management skills
• Development of analytical, theoretical, and strategic thinking skills
• Development of problem solving, networking and communication skills
• Encouragement of creativity, imagination, flexibility and adaptability
• Use of solid academic social science hazards, disasters and EM research literature
• Literacy in research methodologies, analysis, techniques and literature
• Mastery of Concepts and Principles of Emergency Management and HLS
• Knowledge of intergovernmental/intragovernmental systems EM operates within
• Risk-Driven/Based EM (Hazard Identification, Risk Assessment/Analysis, Capabilities Analysis, Gap Analysis, and Risk Management)
• Methodologies to identify community and social hazards vulnerabilities and the design and implementation of vulnerability reduction and resilience enhancement.
• Growth of diversity sensitivity – and one size does not fit all belief system.
• Multi-disciplinary perspective (academic and practitioner disciplines)
• Experiential learning opportunities and applied emergency management combined with a rigorous and challenging academic curriculum.
• Instilling in students desire to be life-long learners
• Distinctions between pre-doctrinal nature of Hi-Ed and doctrinal nature of training – role of Hi-Ed is not to indoctrinate but to educate, while the role of training is more properly the province of indoctrination into missions, tasks and objectives – doctrine.

Advocate for Walking the Talk – encourage EM Hi-Ed community to engage with surrounding communities, provide community service, become team member and leader in disaster prevention/preparedness enculturation.



Tasks -- FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Program

College Courses, Books and Material: Develop, acquire and make freely-available educational material in support of the EM Hi-Ed and professional communities. To date 22 college courses have been developed. Existing materials can be accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/collegecrsbooks.asp

• Progressively assist in Development/Refinement of EM Collegiate Curricula – current collection of Emergency Management Competencies and Currricula materials accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/EMCompetencies.asp

• Clearinghouse GovDelivery Communication Channel to EM Hi-Ed Community.
o Support the EMI goal of enhancing mission success by adopting results orientated business approach through the use of GovDelivery. GovDelivery operates in conjunction with EMI internet website and supports the dissemination of EM Hi-Ed Reports to all subscribers – currently at ~7,000 EM Hi Ed Report subscribers.
o Maintain Archive of several thousand EM Hi-Ed Reports dating back to 2002, and accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/activityRA.asp
o Share EM Hi-Ed research and survey results. Accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/surveys.asp
o Share educational resources. See, for example:
 http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/syllabi.asp
 http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/needsAT.asp
 http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/proposalcomp.asp
o Share best practices in collegiate emergency management program growth. See:
 http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/EMgrow.asp
o Share Models of Collegiate Emergency Management Experiential Learning. See:
 http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/sl_em.asp
o Share governmental emergency management and related materials. See:
 Guide to Emergency Management and Related Terms, Definitions, Concepts, Acronyms, Organizations, Programs, Guidance, Executive Orders & Legislation. ~1200 pages. Accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/docs/terms%20and%20definitions/Terms%20and%20Definitions.pdf
 Bibliography of Emergency Management and Related References. ~750 p. http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/docs/Wayne's%20Bibliography.doc

• Host unique annual Emergency Management Higher Education Conference to serve needs of EM Hi-Ed and EM Professional communities and provide outreach to related communities of interest and partnership. Information on most current conference at: http://training.fema.gov/emiweb/edu/educonference08.asp

Information on and proceedings from EM Hi Id Conferences 2000–2007 accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/highlinks.asp

• Support, collect, collaborate, coordinate, publicize and work toward a more consensual sense of the composition of the Emergency Management Body of Knowledge, including maintenance and growth of a body of knowledge depository of emergency management materials. At: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/readinglist.asp

• Maintain The College List of all U.S. institutions of higher education with Emergency Management and Related Programs, which is divided into the following categories:
o Emergency Management Programs
o Homeland Security Programs
o Hazards and Disaster oriented Public Health, Medical, and Related Programs
o International Disaster Relief and Humanitarian Assistance Programs
o Emergency and Disaster Management Programs in Other Countries
o Distance Learning Programs
o Related Programs
o Programs Being Investigated, Proposed, and Under Development
o Data Documents
 Alphabetical Listing of Emergency Management Collegiate Programs
 Listing of Emergency Management Collegiate Programs by State
 Listing of Emergency Management Collegiate Programs by Type
 States With and Without Emergency Management Programs
Accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/collegelist/

• Maintain and grow the existing large collection of hundreds of hazard, disaster, emergency management and homeland security course syllabi in the EM Hi Ed Syllabi Compilation. Accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/syllabi.asp

• Support Collegiate Articulation Initiatives: Support efforts to regularize distinctions between EM curricula at the Associate, Bachelors, and graduate Masters and Doctoral levels – particularly through the scheduling of Breakout Sessions on this topic during the annual FEMA EM Hi-Ed Conferences – so that students can move through collegiate levels without course duplication. Past breakout session products can be accessed within the Conference Archives at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/highlinks.asp

• Solicit and maintain case studies of Experiential Learning in Emergency Management, divided into the following categories:
o Field-Based Practicums
o Internships
o Service Learning
o Disaster Work
o Exercise Participation Accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/sl_em.asp

• Serve as a Clearinghouse for the transfer of Emergency Management Institute professional and vocational-level training courses to the EM Hi-Ed Community – accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/highnews.asp

• Support the collection of and publicize data on the State of EM Higher Education – accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/surveys.asp

• Support the Emergency Management Roundtable and its work on the Principles of Emergency Management and Emergency Management Training and Education Doctrine through collaboration with stakeholder organization representatives to the EM Roundtable; serving as the coordination hub for the design, development and distribution of EM Roundtable documents; and serving as the EM Roundtable member responsible for integration of EM Roundtable products (such as the Principles of Emergency Management Statement) into FEMA materials, culture and lexicon. “Principles” documents are accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/emprinciples.asp

• Facilitate a national public-private effort to promulgate best practices and methodologies that promote Emergency Management Professionalism and refinement of the academic discipline of emergency management through such tools as the collection of best practices through maintenance and expansion of such tools as the “Practitioners Corner,” the “Growing Your EM Program,” and the “Articles, Papers and Presentations,” on the FEMA EM-Hi-Ed Program Website – accessible at:

http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/practitioner.asp
http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/EMgrow.asp
http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/highpapers.asp

• Maintain Internship Opportunities for students enrolled in collegiate EM Programs – information at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/faq_courses.asp

• Collaborate with broad range of Stakeholder organizations and entities for the purpose of EM Hi-Ed Project design, development and future growth, as well as to contribute to goal attainment of stakeholder organizations in areas of interest intersection.

• Partner with other FEMA elements, other Department of Homeland Security elements, other Federal organizations, State and Local Emergency Management Organizations, and the Private Sector in the funding and development of Emergency Management Higher Education materials – such as college courses and supporting books and other materials.

Examples of co-funded joint course/textbook development partnerships include:

• Charleston Coastal Services Center, National Weather Service, NOAA
• FEMA Disaster Operations Directorate
• FEMA Emergency Management Institute, Readiness Section
• National Floodplain Management Association
• National Science Foundation
• North Carolina Division of Emergency Management
• Public Entity Risk Institute
• United States Army Corp of Engineers
• Currently developing partnership with the FEMA National Integration Center Incident Management Systems Integration Division – development of NIMS college course and investigating with the Logistics Division the development of a Logistics Management Higher Education course project..

• Continue/expand Building of Bridges to Homeland Security and Homeland Defense Higher Education Communities in flexible and collaborative manner. Have in the past:

o Developed in 2000 a college course on Terrorism and Emergency Management – accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/tem.asp

o Developed in 2001/2002 a several hundred page Terrorism Bibliography – accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/terrbiblio.asp

o Developed in 2003 a Terrorism CD ROM of EMI and National Fire Academy training courses related to terrorism, homeland security, weapons of mass destruction, mass casualties, ICS, etc. for provision to institutions of Hi-Ed.

o Partnered in 2006 with NORTHCOM to incorporate the annual NORTHCOM Homeland Defense and Homeland Security Education Consortium Spring Meeting in with the annual FEMA Emergency Management Higher Education Conference and changed the name to the Emergency Management & Homeland Security/Defense Higher Education Conference 2006 – agenda and materials at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/06conf/Conference%20Agenda%202006.doc

o Developed in 2006 a college course on Homeland Security and Emer. Mgmt. – accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/hsm.asp

o Have invited representatives of collegiate Homeland Security and Homeland Defense educational programs and Consortiums to all EM Hi-Ed Conferences.

o Incorporation of Homeland Security and Defense references into the Bibliography of EM and Related References.

o Incorporation of Homeland Security and Defense terms, definitions, acronyms, and program descriptions into the Guide to EM and Related Terms and Defs.

• Revise, update and extend dated EM Hi Ed Program College Courses found in the “Free College Courses” section of the EM Hi Ed Program website at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/collegecrsbooks.asp

• Maintain the Emergency Management Higher Education Program Introductory Slide Presentation – currently at 118 slides – and accessible at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/docs/HighEd%20Slide%20Presentation.ppt

• Maintain collection of collegiate Needs Assessment Tools which have been utilized to determine from community stakeholders their level of interest and support for the development of a new emergency management collegiate program and at what level and focus. Accessed at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/needsAT.asp

• Maintain Emergency Management Job Market Data collected from the U.S. Department of Labor. At: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/jobmarket.asp

• Maintain and grow collection of proposals which have been written on college campuses as part of projects to institute new educational emergency management programs at various colleges and universities. Accessible in the Proposals Compendium at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/docs/01-COMPENDIUM%20of%20EM.doc

• Historical Knowledge Base: Maintain and grow unique collection of documents from the history of civil defense, emergency management and homeland security in the U.S. which are not electronically accessible on the Internet and are of historical, if not current, value – by scanning government documents typically found only in FEMA’s Learning Resource Center at the National Emergency Training Center in paper copy, and converting them into PDF files accessible to the public on the EM Hi-Ed Program website, at: http://training.fema.gov/EMIWeb/edu/highref.asp

These documents primarily deal with civil defense and emergency management program and policy initiatives of the past which should be instructive to today’s emergency management homeland security educational and professional communities.


Plan for EM Hi-Ed Program for Fiscal Years 2009-2013

1. New College Course Development Projects:

The EM Hi-Ed Program proposes 15 new course development projects over the next five years (3 per year). A listing of 19 courses advocated by members of the Emergency Management Higher Education community is provided below:

1. Cost Benefit Analysis in Emergency Management
2. Exercises in Emergency Management
a. Introduction to the role of exercises in emergency management
b. HSEEP (Homeland Security Exercise & Evaluation Program)
3. Hazards Engineering for Non-Engineers
4. Hazards in the U.S. Survey Course -- Overview Course of U.S. Hazards
5. Hazards Planning for Engineering and Building Construction Professions (Graduate)
6. Hazards Planning for Planning Programs (Graduate Level)
7. History of Emergency Management
8. International/Comparative Disaster Management
9. Legal Basis for, and Ethical/Legal Issues in, Emergency Management
10. Logistics and Resource Management in Emergency Management
11. National Disaster Response Planning, e.g.
a. Catastrophic Earthquake Preparedness Plan
b. Natural Hazards Response Plan
c. National Contingency Plan
d. Federal Response Plan
e. National Response Plan
f. National Response Framework
12. Planning in Emergency Management, Undergraduate Introduction to Plan Types, e.g.
a. Basic Emergency Operations Plan (SLG 101/CPG 1)
b. Continuity of Government and Operations Plans
c. Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000 Mitigation Plans
d. Strategic Planning
13. Planning in Emergency Management, Graduate Analysis of Planning Models, e.g,
a. Capabilities-Based Planning
b. Contingency and Crisis Action Planning
c. Hazard Specific versus All-Hazard Planning Models
d. Military Joint Planning and Execution System (JOPES) Model
e. Scenario-Based Planning
14. Policy Development and Analysis in Hazards, Disasters and EM, Graduate Course
15. Psychological Dimensions of Disaster
16. Risk Assessment and Capabilities and Gap Analysis in Emergency Management
17. Risk Communication/Communication of Risk in Emergency Management
18. Research and Survey Methods in Emergency Management, Graduate Course
19. Theory of Emergency Management, Graduate Course


2. Revise Existing Emergency Management Higher Education Courses.

There are 22 completed upper division and graduate-level courses developed for the EM Hi-Ed Program since 1995. All 22 courses need revision and modernization. Three courses have been contracted for revision in FY 2008:

• Business and Industry Crisis Management (1999)
• The Political and Policy Basis of Emergency Management (1998)
• Public Administration and Emergency Management (2000)

We propose three course revision projects per year for FY’s 2009-2013, which would lead to the revision of 18 of the remaining 19 courses over the next five years:

• Sociology of Disaster (1996)
• Research and Analysis Methods in Emer. Mgmt., Undergraduate-Level (1998)
• Technology and Emergency Management (1999)
• EM Principles and Application for Tourism, Hospitality, and Travel Management (2000)
• Individual and Community Disaster Education (2000)
• Principles and Practices of Hazard Mitigation (2000)
• Terrorism and Emergency Management (2000)
• Building Disaster Resilient Communities (2002)
• A Social Vulnerability Approach to Disasters (2003)
• Breaking the Disaster Cycle: Future Directions in Natural Hazard Mitigation (Grad, 04)
• Earthquake Hazard and Emergency Management (2004)
• Hazards Risk Management (2004)
• Holistic Disaster Recovery: Creating a More Sustainable Future (2004)
• Social Dimensions of Disaster, 2nd Ed. (2004)
• Disaster Response Operations and Management (2005)
• Coastal Hazards Management (2006)
• Floodplain Management – An Integrated Approach, Graduate Course (2006)
• Hazard Mapping and Modeling (2006)
• Homeland Security and Emergency Management (2006)

3. Expansion of Emergency Management Collegiate Programs – Community Colleges: Approximately 50 of the approximately 150 emergency management collegiate programs today are at the community college level. There are over 1,100 community colleges in the U.S. There are many dozens of thousands of emergency services, emergency management and private sector personnel as the audience for community college programs. Given the ready availability of EMI training and EM Hi-Ed courses, there is a need to prioritize promotion of EM programs at the community college level. We seek to at least double the number of EM CC programs by 2013.

4. Expansion of Emergency Management Collegiate Programs – Upper Division/Graduate: There are several dozen colleges in the US we are aware of which are investigating the development of an emergency management program. We propose to actively engage with these and other institutions of higher education to promote the development of additional collegiate EM programs. We anticipate a minimum of five new upper division/graduate EM programs per year for fiscal years 2009-2013. In addition, the EM Hi-Ed Program will work to expand, progress, and firmly establish the existing collegiate EM programs in the US.

5. Advocacy and Transfer Point Mission:
In order to better support the vision of a New FEMA, to support the goals of National Preparedness Directorate, and the EM-related mission-area of DHS, it is important to communicate knowledge of the large and growing range of FEMA and DHS and component documents and material to the EM Hi-Ed Community. This "Transfer Point" service extends beyond the maintenance of a Communications Hub between the USG and the EM Hi-Ed community, to more active engagement with the EM Hi-Ed and EM Professional communities. Examples would be taking advantage of opportunities as exist in attending and presenting in a very wide range of national academic and professional settings -- from associations of community colleges, associations of collegiate emergency managers and public safety officers, associations of emergency management personnel, to the large range of academic disciplinary meetings (such as can be found in Public Administration, Political Science, Sociology, Geography, and other academic disciplines).

(6) Annual Emergency Management Higher Education Conference:
From a low of about 35 participants at the first FEMA EM Hi-Ed Program Emergency Management Conference, these conferences have now grown to an attendance level of 270 participants in the 2007 EM Hi-Ed Conference -- with a larger attendance each year than the year before. For the last four years the annual EMI Hi-Ed Conference has been the largest attended event held at the National Emergency Training Center (EMI, National Fire Academy, United States Fire Administration), with the exception of the annual Fallen Firefighter Memorial weekend. The conference agenda has grown from 3 pages to 36 and this conference has become a nationally-recognized event. The EM Hi-Ed Program plans to continue and grow this one-of-a kind annual conference for the EM Hi-Ed Community and seek to transition it into an internationally-recognized event with increased international participation.

(7) Integration of EM Hi-Ed Materials into EMI Training Courses:
Twenty-two upper division and graduate-level college courses have been contract developed with college faculty -- averaging over 500 pages each. In addition, the FEMA EM Hi-Ed Program has supported the development of several textbooks, case study books, video clips and a variety of other materials to support collegiate emergency management programs and courses. The EM Hi-Ed Program has also collected a large number of emergency management related articles, reports, studies, power point slide presentations and other material and made this material accessible to the emergency management higher education community – much of it state of the art hazards and disasters research literature. Virtually none of this very large volume of many thousands of pages of academically-oriented material has been utilized by the EM training community.

There are a variety of explanations for this, including inadequate staffing levels and thus the lack of the considerable staff time it takes to read and study the social science material produced by the EM Hi-Ed Program, recognize which training course material the EM Hi-Ed material relate to, and then serve as the advocate and subject-matter-expert for the integration of EM Hi-Ed Program produced material into EMI training courses through an established course revision schedule. EMI training courses over a large area domain would benefit from an exposure to and integration of social science based EM Hi-Ed Program developed materials. This requires staff from within the EM Hi-Ed Program to work to integrate EM Hi-Ed Program materials into the large domain of EMI training materials in order to enhance their potential and provide an academic and theory-driven underpinning to training materials.

(8) EM Hi-Ed Program Budget Growth:
In order to better accomplish the mission areas, goals, objectives and tasks noted above, the EM Hi-Ed Program proposes to grow the current funding level which averages less than $200K annually, to $600K.

(9) EM Hi-Ed Program Staffing:
The EM Hi-Ed Program consists of one full-time dedicated staff member – a GS-14 Program Manager – and one permanent fulltime Administrative Assistant.

In order to better accomplish the mission areas, goals, objectives and tasks noted above, the EM Hi-Ed Program proposes to grow the current staffing level of 2 full time staff to a staffing level of seven personnel dedicated full-time to the EM Hi-Ed Program.

Fiscal Years 2009 – 2013 Budget Requirements

FY 2009 Budget Needs: $680K
$ 300K – Three new course development projects
$ 110K – Three course revision/modernization projects
$ 80K – Focus Group Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund (8 x 10K)
• Three new course development focus groups
• Three course revision focus groups
• Two Emergency Management Roundtable/Focus Group Meetings
$ 25K – EMI Support Contractor, contract modification, support EM Hi-Ed Pgm Conf. & docs.
$ 50K – EM Hi-Ed Conference Materials and Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 25K – Production of EM Hi-Ed Conference Proceedings Report
$ 50K – Micro Purchase Work Order Fund for EM Hi-Ed Program Materials Development
$ 5K – Travel
$ 5K – Intern Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 5K – Credit Card Purchase of Materials and Copyright Approvals
$ 25K – Furniture and Office Materials for one new staff member

FY 2010 Budget Needs: $688K
$ 300K – Three new course development projects
$ 115K – Three course revision/modernization projects
$ 88K – Focus Group Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund (8 x 11K)
• Three new course development focus groups
• Three course revision focus groups
• Two Emergency Management Roundtable/Focus Group Meetings
$ 30K – EMI Support Contractor, contract modification, support EM Hi-Ed Pgm Conf. & docs.
$ 50K – EM Hi-Ed Conference Materials and Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 25K – Production of EM Hi-Ed Conference Proceedings Report
$ 50K – Micro Purchase Work Order Fund for EM Hi-Ed Program Materials Development
$ 5K – Travel
$ 5K – Intern Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 5K – Credit Card Purchase of Materials and Copyright Approvals
$ 25K – Furniture and Office Materials for one new staff member

FY 2011 Budget Needs: $716K
$ 300K – Three new course development projects
$ 120K – Three course revision/modernization projects
$ 96K – Focus Group Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund (8 x 12K)
• Three new course development focus groups
• Three course revision focus groups
• Two Emergency Management Roundtable/Focus Group Meetings
$ 35K – EMI Support Contractor, contract modification, support EM Hi-Ed Pgm Conf. & docs.
$ 50K – EM Hi-Ed Conference Materials and Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 25K – Production of EM Hi-Ed Conference Proceedings Report
$ 50K – Micro Purchase Work Order Fund for EM Hi-Ed Program Materials Development
$ 5K – Travel
$ 5K – Intern Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 5K – Credit Card Purchase of Materials and Copyright Approvals
$ 25K – Furniture and Office Materials for one new staff member

FY 2012 Budget Needs: $734K

$ 300K – Three new course development projects
$ 125K – Three course revision/modernization projects
$ 104K – Focus Group Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund (8 x 13K)
• Three new course development focus groups
• Three course revision focus groups
• Two Emergency Management Roundtable/Focus Group Meetings
$ 40K – EMI Support Contractor, contract modification, support EM Hi-Ed Pgm Conf. & docs.
$ 50K – EM Hi-Ed Conference Materials and Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 25K – Production of EM Hi-Ed Conference Proceedings Report
$ 50K – Micro Purchase Work Order Fund for EM Hi-Ed Program Materials Development
$ 5K – Travel
$ 5K – Intern Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 5K – Credit Card Purchase of Materials and Copyright Approvals
$ 25K – Furniture and Office Materials for one new staff member

FY 2013 Budget Needs: $763K

$ 300K – Three new course development projects
$ 130K – Three course revision/modernization projects
$ 112K – Focus Group Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund (8 x 14K)
• Three new course development focus groups
• Three course revision focus groups
• Two Emergency Management Roundtable/Focus Group Meetings
$ 45K – EMI Support Contractor, contract modification, support EM Hi-Ed Pgm Conf. & docs.
$ 50K – EM Hi-Ed Conference Materials and Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 25K – Production of EM Hi-Ed Conference Proceedings Report
$ 50K – Micro Purchase Work Order Fund for EM Hi-Ed Program Materials Development
$ 5K – Travel
$ 5K – Intern Support Micro Purchase Work Order Fund
$ 5K – Credit Card Purchase of Materials and Copyright Approvals
$ 25K – Furniture and Office Materials for one new staff member

Obstacles to EM Hi-Ed Program Development:

Insufficient Financial Resources
Insufficient Human Resources
Insufficient Support
Insufficient Authority
Access to information – Need to Know/FOUO Culture rather than Need to Share
Time constraints

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